7 ways to fix menstrual cup leaks

For new menstrual cup users leaks are perfectly normal, and on average it can take about one to three cycles before you have a leak-free period. If you’ve been using a menstrual cup for a while now and are still experiencing leaks the tips below can also be quite useful. However, if you’ve tried everything it’s possible that you’re using the incorrect cup size or you need to look at getting a different style of cup. Here are seven of the best ways to troubleshoot any leaks you may be experiencing:

Your cup isn’t opening fully

Once you insert the cup, it needs to open up fully so it can collect all the menstrual blood. To make sure it’s open completely press your fingers against the vaginal wall to allow the cup space to open. You may need to get a firmer cup if you still experience leaks after trying this a few times.

The cup isn’t directly below the cervix

The cervix must be directly above or inside the cup. This means the cup must be situated directly below the cervix to catch the blood and tissue. This is why it’s important to know where your cervix is located, if it’s tilted or low because if you have an idea of where your cervix is you can make sure the cup sits directly below it. Sometimes what happens is that the cervix isn’t in line with the cup and falls slightly on the outside of the cup’s rim, which means the blood passes the cup causing leakage. To ensure the cervix isn’t outside of cup, run your finger around the rim, and if you feel your cervix on the outside you need to re-position the cup.

The cup is too full

Yes, although cups can be left unchanged for up to 12 hours you still need to be weary of your cup getting too full. Even though the seal is pretty strong and reliable, if the cup is full and left that way for too long the blood will find a way to escape.

Cup placement is crucial

The vaginal canal is situated at an angle and isn’t straight. So when inserting the cup insert it at an angle towards your tailbone.

Get rid of any extra air in the cup

Once you’ve inserted the cup squeeze the base twice to get rid of any excess air which could cause leakage. You can also fold the cup extra tight to make sure there’s no extra air when inserting the cup. When it opens, the seal will be even more secure.

Check the seal

If you tug on the base of the cup and feel resistance you have a good seal. If you don’t feel any resistance and the cup becomes dislodged it needs to be reinserted.

Push down your vaginal muscles

When inserting your cup push down your vaginal muscles like you’re having a bowel movement. As you bear down your muscles insert the cup and push it into position. Once the cup is inserted, release your muscles. This will make sure that it’s firmly in place and secure.